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Valentine’s Day Special

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6 Tips to Beat the Winter Blues

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Are you feeling down lately?  You are not alone!  With getting over the holiday season and the gloomy weather it’s easy to fall into a slump.  Many people struggle with the winter blues this time of year, including us!  The good news is that Good Point is here to help!  Here are 6 ways to beat the blues.

  1. Lighten up – Shorter days leave your body and brain craving sunlight which naturally increases the serotonin levels in your body.  Light therapy has been shown to help but it can be pricey.  Luckily, in Texas our winters are mild and we have many sunny days throughout the winter so get out and enjoy it when you can!
  2. Boost Vitamin D –  Again, shorter days and less sunlight can lead to lower vitamin D levels which can leave you feeling fatigued and lower immunity.  A vitamin D supplement can help stave off these and other symptoms.
  3. Move it – More and more studies show that exercising has a significant impact on mood.  Even just a 20 minute walk can make a difference.  And the bonus is that it can help you avoid the winter weight gain.
  4. Tune in – A 2013 research study from the University of Missouri showed that listening to cheerful music can greatly improve mood.  So cue up your dance cardio playlist and this one is a twofer since dancing counts as exercise.
  5. Get Acupuncture – Acupuncture regulates your body’s energy (Qi) and helps prevent stagnation.  Acupuncture also naturally stimulates the release of serotonin.
  6. Oil Up – Aromas have a powerful impact on the limbic system – the part of the brain that controls emotions and memories.  Citrus scents in particular are especially uplifting and invigorating so diffusing blends like doterra’s Cheer, Citrus Bliss, or Motivate can actually help you feel cheerful, blissed out, and motivated.  You can try all of these and more in our office.

Hang in there!  It’s Texas so Spring is right around the corner.

Cheerfully,

Good Point Team

Essential Oils 101

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Free Essential Oils 101 Class

Wednesday, November 14th

6:30pm-8:00pm

at Good Point Acupuncture

• Learn what essential oils are and how to use them
(Hint – they’re not just for diffusers)
• Learn how to make over your medicine cabinet
• Learn how to choose natural solutions for your family
• Make your own blend to take with you

5 Acupuncture Points For Indian Summer

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Acupuncture is part of a medical system that dates back nearly 3,500 years. This medical system is known as Traditional Chinese Medicine or TCM. TCM acknowledges not four but five seasons. The fifth season, Indian Summer, occurs in late August through mid-September. Each season in TCM has a pair of organs or energetic pathways it corresponds to. For Indian Summer, these pathways are those of the spleen and stomach.

The spleen and stomach are directly responsible for digestion. The spleen also has the added function of transporting and absorbing water in the body. When the spleen is not functioning properly, the body may suffer from a buildup of dampness. This can manifest as edema, digestive issues and even brain fog. Many people who have impaired spleen function also suffer from diabetes.

To keep the spleen and stomach functioning properly within the TCM system, things like acupuncture, herbal formulas, nutritional counseling and practices like qi gong or tai chi may need to be incorporated. There are over 350 acupuncture points on the body, but there are some that work exceptionally well during Indian Summer to help with digestion and fluid transport.

 

  1. Spleen 9 – This point is located bilaterally on the inside of the lower leg. It can be found by locating the tibia, following it up the leg to the knee and then feeling for the depression behind and below the lower edge of the tibia. This acupuncture point is a wonderful point to use to help drain edema and decrease abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea.

 

  1. Stomach 25 – This point is located bilaterally on the lower abdomen. It can be found about 2 finger-breadths laterally away from the middle of the belly button and completely level with it. This point is part of a group known as the four doors. Stomach 25 is used to treat abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, diarrhea and edema.

 

  1. Ren 6 – This point is located on the midline of the abdomen, about one and a half thumb-breadths directly below the belly button. This is another point that is part of the four doors grouping. Ren 6 can be used to help with abdominal pain, edema, diarrhea, constipation and menstrual problems.

 

  1. Ren 12 – This point is located on the midline of the abdomen, about four thumb-breadths directly above the belly button. This is the final point that completes the four doors grouping. Just like its counterparts, Ren 12 can help with bloating, abdominal pain and diarrhea. It is also used to treat stomachaches, acid reflux, vomiting and diarrhea.

 

  1. Spleen 6 – This point is located bilaterally on the inside of the lower leg. It is found three thumb-breadths above the medial ankle bone and just behind the tibia. Spleen 6 is frequently used by acupuncturists. It helps with abdominal pain and bloating, diarrhea, menstrual problems, urinary leakage, edema, dizziness, vertigo and insomnia.

Any of these points can be used alone or in conjunction with others. They can be manually stimulated using pressure from a finger or dull, rounded tool. But for best effects, it is recommended acupuncture be applied.

 

Healthy Eating For Winter

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Winter, in most places, is a time of colder, shorter days. So naturally, when there is less reason to be outdoors, the body tends to want to stay inside where it is warmer. The body’s metabolic rate will be slower, which means eating foods full of sugars can become detrimental over time. When the metabolic rate slows, the body naturally holds onto fat and we gain weight. Just as most animals hibernate throughout the colder winter months, so too should human beings take the information being given and use it accordingly.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, winter is a time of preservation and building up strength for the spring. Winter is a time when the kidneys are highly active. They have functions that help the body preserve energy. Foods loaded with salt can actually burden the kidneys and cause them to work overtime. This can lead to kidney disease or kidney failure when done for many years.

Tonics are what should be primarily eaten during the winter months according to TCM. Most tonics include warming herbs, fatty foods and meats. The human body is designed to absorb these rich foods especially well at this time of year. By tuning into nature, humans can be guided toward the proper nutrients. Since fruits are not usually abundant during the winter months, it makes sense we should not be eating large quantities of them. Foods such as fruits, salads and raw foods can deplete the immune system because it will have to work overtime to warm the body. If a person has a dislike of cold weather, joint aches and pains, sore low back or catches cold frequently, then there is too much of an imbalance and that person may be consuming too many cold foods.

It is recommended to eat warming foods during the winter months. Foods that will strengthen the kidneys, blood and Qi (pronounced “chee”), which is sometimes considered our inner form of energy.  Foods that would be best include beef, lamb, root vegetables, dark leafy greens, black beans, oats, quinoa, pumpkin, kidney beans and walnuts. Fruits can be warmed by adding spices like cinnamon, so they don’t tax the system too much. Herbs such as ginseng, garlic, onion, ginger, parsley and basil all have warming properties too that can be used when cooking.

Soups and stews are particularly good to eat at this time of year. Those that utilize bone broth as a base can be very tonifying. These types of foods help warm the body’s core and keep us fully nourished. Cooking should be for longer periods over low heat using less water. This will infuse the food with heat and lasting nourishment.

TCM nutritional therapy is a very important component of the medical system. The food consumed can have profound effects on the body that affect our health and well-being. Along with paying close attention to the foods that are abundant during the seasons, it is also recommended that locally grown foods be utilized. This may help decrease the possibility of allergic reactions.